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6 Steps to Avoid Employee Burnout

As offices across Ireland continue to re-open and organisations look towards a post-pandemic future, in which hybrid working models have become the default, much emphasis will be placed upon maintaining the productivity increases achieved through lockdowns. With the shift to hybrid working, the distinction between work time and personal time is likely to remain an issue for the foreseeable future, as is employee anxiety over office work and health and safety.

As offices across Ireland continue to re-open and organisations look towards a post-pandemic future, in which hybrid working models have become the default, much emphasis will be placed upon maintaining the productivity increases achieved through lockdowns. 

Striking a balance between too much and too little workplace pressure is a fine art. Too little, and your people will likely become bored and disinterested. Too much, and you run the risk of burnout.  

And that seems to be exactly the case here in Ireland, as new HRLocker survey of 1,000 people in full-time employment has revealed that over half (52%) are experiencing burnout, with those working for charities and not-for-profits reporting much higher incidences of 68%. 

What is Job Burnout?

A growing concern across the globe, in 2020 the World Health Organisation (WHO) classified job burnout as a medical condition, describing it as “a syndrome conceptualised as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed…Burn-out refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life.” 

In short, while a certain amount of work-place stress can positively impact an employee’s performance and satisfaction levels, prolonged, unmanageable levels of stress can lead to long-term physical and mental health issues. 

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Because we all deal with stress differently, job burnout can manifest in different ways. However, some of the more common signs of the condition include: 

  • – Feeling exhausted or depleted of energy
  • – Feeling mentally and emotionally removed from your job
  • – Feeling negative, cynical, or disillusioned about your job
  • – Reduced satisfactions from your achievements
  • – Reduced professional efficacy
  • – Difficulty concentrating
  • – Unexplained physical ailments such as headaches and stomach pains

Many of these symptoms can be related to depression and other underlying illnesses. As such, it is always advised that individuals speak to a doctor or medical health provider if they’re experiencing one or more of them.  

With the shift to hybrid working, the distinction between work time and personal time is likely to remain an issue for the foreseeable future, as is employee anxiety over office work and health and safety.  

Now, more than ever, organisations must take effective measures to support their employees. Introducing processes to monitor workload, putting employee support structures and establishing a constructive, two-way dialogue with their teams.

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